Ireland - Blackfriary






Overview

The Black Friary community archaeology project is a unique, hands-on opportunity for students to excavate the buried remains of a 13th century Dominican friary in the town of Trim. Founded in 1263 CE, the friary was the focus of political and ecclesiastical assembly during the late medieval period.  In the post-medieval period, the friary buildings were dismantled but the place itself retained significance locally and continued in use as a burial ground.  This project is focused on the excavation of the remains of the friary, and has three research components.  For 2014, we will continue to investigate the scope and layout of the friary buildings, and associated infrastructure.  We will also explore mortuary contexts so we may determine the area and extent of the cemetery and of burials within the area of the church and cloister.  This is a community archaeology project and one of our principle goals is to engage the local people of Trim with this project.  We will hold community open days, visits to the sites from both local groups and tourists, school visits and the participation of local volunteers on site. Students should expect that interaction between members of the public and the excavation environment is an evolving one, as local people re-assess their own relationship with a site and its significance.  For a short video of this program, click here.  

Ireland Blackfriary Archaeology Field School - Institute for Field Research Field Schools Ireland - Blackfriary18-352014-06-20
Course Dates: Jun 22 - Jul 26 2014
Enrollment Status: OPEN 
Total Cost: $ 5,150 
Course Type: Field Archaeology
Instructors: Dr. Stephen Mandal, Ms. Finola O'Carroll, Dr. Rachel Scott

Course Syllabus 



Instructors

Stephen Mandal

Dr. Stephen Mandal

Dr. Mandal (stephen.mandal@crds.ie) is the Director of the Irish Archaeology Field School.  For a short video of this program, click here.  
Finola O'Carroll

Ms. Finola O'Carroll

Ms. O’Carroll (finola.ocarroll@crds.ie) is a member of the Irish Archaeology Field School and Staff at the National Monument Service, Department of Arts, Heritage & Gaeltacht (Ireland).
Rachel Scott

Dr. Rachel Scott

Dr. Scott is a Bioarchaeologist and an Assistant Professor at the Department of Anthropology, DePaul University.  

Testimonials

The Black Friary community archaeology project is a unique, hands-on opportunity for students to excavate the buried remains of a 13th century Dominican friary in the town of Trim. Founded in 1263 CE, the friary was the focus of political and ecclesiastical assembly during the late medieval period. In the post-medieval period, the friary buildings were dismantled but the place itself retained significance locally and continued in use as a burial ground. This project is focused on the excavation of the remains of the friary, and has three research components; to investigate the scope and layout of the friary buildings and associated infrastructure, to explore the mortuary contexts of the friary and the later children's burial ground, and to support community engagement with the local people of Trim through an active program of heritage interpretation and outreach.

 

"I’m from Canada, I’m a student, my second year in anthropology is done. I want to specialise in archaeology, probably more bio-archaeology but I’m not sure yet, all that I know is that I really love archaeology and I found out while doing that field, which gave me a good idea what’s going on in the field, so I really, really like it. I kind of feel like home while doing that and I don’t want to leave."

-Marye-Claude, Université de Montréal (2011)

“I would really like to return next year to see what’s different, we only have a week and a half left of Blackfriary, and even though I’ve learned a lot it doesn’t seem like I’ve learned that much at the same time; there’s so much to do, so much to learn in four weeks and its all gone by way to quickly. But I found that I really like osteo-archaeology, I found I really like finding bodies, discovering if it’s human or not, how old it night be or what bone it is. So it’s all very interesting and I’d love to come back next year.”

-Malika, Western Washington University (2011)

“The first time I went to Ireland to participate in the Irish Archaeological Field School was my first time travelling out of the country alone, as well as my first real excavation experience. I had no idea where I was or what to expect. The second time I went, I could barely contain my excitement because, in a sense, I was going home….both times, I have been amazed (but welcomed) how quickly the students bond with one another. All aspects of the excavation are taught, from excavation techniques to surveying techniques, recording techniques and onward. The practical knowledge that comes out of an excavation such as this, along with the memories that come alongside it, is a unique and beneficial experience I would recommend to any archaeology student or even any person merely interested in this field. Thanks to my IAFS experience, I have made friends from all over the world and from all across my native United States. It was for that reason, even, that I found myself in Australia this past semester on a study abroad experience, taking university classes with team members and friends from my first field school group”.

-Emma, Hofstra University (2010) 

"My time in Ireland participating in the Blackfriary excavations was one of the most fantastic experiences I have ever had. It is always tough to go off on an adventure alone, but IFR made it so easy by organizing accommodations and food, and by letting me know that there would be help at every step of the way. The Blackfriary site was incredible; excavating bones and church architecture, as well as getting to know the community made this the best excavation that I have participated in and I can't wait to go back! I learned what I want to do with my career in archaeology, and what direction I want to take, and I feel that because this opportunity allows for the chance to explore archaeology and also Ireland, it is one that should not be passed up." 

-Hilary, Wilfred Laurier University (2013)

 

 

 

Student Fees

Early Enrollment Begins November 15 - Full payment must be received by April 1  
(Full Payment = Deposit + Tuition)
 Payment by Cashier or Personal Check  Payment by Credit Card/Debit Card
Deposit: 500 USD  Deposit:  510 USD 
Tuition:  4,650 USD  Tuition:  4,740 USD 
TOTAL: 5,150 USD TOTAL: 5,250 USD


Late Enrollment Begins April 2 - Full payment must be received 10 days prior to course start date
(Full Payment = Deposit + Tuition)
 Payment by Cashier or Personal Check  Payment by Credit Card/Debit Card
Deposit: 500 USD  Deposit:  510 USD 
Tuition:  4,750 USD  Tuition:  4,840 USD 
TOTAL: 5,250 USD TOTAL: 5,350 USD

Accommodations

Students will be housed in shared accommodation, in self-catering chalets at the Knightsbrook Hotel, Trim, Co. Meath. Students will walk to and from the site daily, a distance of 1.6 miles (35 min walk).  Students are required to keep the accommodation clean and tidy at all times, and to be respectful towards their room-mates.

MEALS:  Breakfast and dinner will be provided at the accommodation, and a packed lunch will be provided for on-site.  Meals are provided throughout the week.  Students are responsible for their weekend meals and are encouraged to avail of their free time and explore Ireland.  Specialized diets (vegan, kosher, gluten-free, etc.) may be impossible to satisfy in this location.